Tuesday, 27 December 2011

Sorcerer's apprentice Protective Force field

Credit: Walt Disney Pictures

Inspired by scene from Sorcerer's apprentice when protective force field protects heros from deadly fire I designed fully procedural shield system, this time with various controls...

Basically it`s possible to control how much fire will deflect, spread etc. Particles are controlling shape.  Controls are designed for animators so they can design specific look. I used spherical protective shape but it`s also possible to use any other shape. System if fully customizable to fit in any kind of pipeline since it`s possible to export particles to various packages like Maya or Houdini. Exported particles will be able to drive fluids like I published here


This procedural simulation is digital asset, meaning it`s fully customisable and adaptable to almost any production pipeline. If you think this could be useful for your studio pipeline, contact me personally.

16 comments:

  1. Nice!
    1) Did you use second mesh (sphere in this case) to use for UDeflector?
    2) Did you use some kind of texture (noise perhaps) to have particles to move along the sphere more like fluids?

    thanks in advance

    3ak

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  2. Hi,
    thanks!
    1 - yes, sphere is UDeflector at the same time
    2 - I used turbulence, u can use any kind of force with some kind of noise

    Regards,
    Borko

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  3. Please do some quick tutorials on how do you make those effects..

    I've not much experience and knowledge on using particles, so little how-to will be grat

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  4. Hi,

    yes, that`s my plan once I got some time off. Thanks

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  5. everything really looking cool in here borko !!!

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  6. Thanks Bun, new updates are coming soon!

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  7. Love this, Borko. I'm going to try and rebuild what you did. I assume you're wiring the "Float" switch to a force operator containing a grav force in pflow??

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    Replies
    1. Hi Anton,

      thanks! it`s TP, not pflow, similar method was used. float control was wired to force, that force keeps particles together

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  8. AnonymousJune 19, 2012

    I worked on that movie. I know the guy who did the original effect. It was done with a combination of Houdini and Dneg proprietary fluid solver DNsquirt, written my the same guy who wrote Naiad.

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  9. wow! thanks for info, my effect reconstruction uses particles to drive fluids. did you have custom controls for that Houdini digital asset?

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  10. Borko, only when I'm in the industry did I realize that employers require vfx artists to know programming (mel scripting & python) to generate the effects in Maya. They r impatient people who cannot allow vfx artists to experiment trial & error to get results. They rather the vfx artist know very advanced python programming and use the commands to control vfx results (e.g., flow direction, density, gravity, drag, collisions, combo vfx).

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    Replies
    1. ha, ha, yes I know because deadlines are short therefore effects animation should be handled by effect TD, they are skilled enough to deal with short deadlines and they should do some r&d before project starts

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  11. hey Borko Milohanovic, any idea to create this in maya??? like goaling the shape

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    Replies
    1. well, once particles collide with a shape some friction or glue (if you are using nParticles) should hold them, also I would use some particle events to trigger secondary emission

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    2. on the other hand, for customised interface, for users (eg. animators), I think u`ll need Python or mel to expose those controls

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    3. thanx for replyy :), ok once the particle collide, i will use the events particles to move/goal on the surface????

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